What we do


Asheville uses the council-manager form of local government, under which elected City Council members are the community leaders and policy makers who establish a vision for Asheville, and who hire the city manager to carry out policy and ensure that all residents are equitably served. The manager coordinates the work of department heads and other employees, who help ensure the smooth and efficient delivery of services. By building public/private partnerships, managers target all of a community’s resources to solve current problems. The city manager’s primary responsibility is to keep our community running smoothly.

To be successful, complex local government operations require strong political leadership, policy development, a relentless focus on execution and results, a commitment to transparent and ethical government, and a strategy for representing and engaging every segment of the community. The city manager:

  • Works with elected officials as they develop policies. The manager may discuss problems and recommendations, propose new plans, or discuss issues that affect the community and its residents.
  • Ensures that laws and policies approved by elected officials are equitably enforced throughout the city.
  • Develops recommendations for new programs indicating scope, cost and impact for consideration by City Council.
  • Prepares the annual budget, submits it to elected officials for approval and implements it once approved.
  • Supervises department heads and other employees and top appointees who are responsible for day-to-day operations of the city.
  • Ensures customer service efficiency and effectiveness.

City of Asheville Organizational Chart

 


 

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City of Asheville to observe its first Juneteenth holiday 

    On June 18, Asheville City offices will be closed in observance of Juneteenth, also known as Freedom Day or Emancipation Day. Technically on June 19, it marks the anniversary of June 19, 1865, when enslaved African-Americans in Galveston, Texas, were finally  told they were free. These enslaved people learned they were free two years after [...]

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Asheville City Council makes initial $2.1 million in reparations funding appropriation

    At their June 8 meeting, Asheville City Council voted to appropriate $2.1 million in proceeds from the sale of City-owned land at 172 and 174 South Charlotte Street to fund community reparations. A portion of this property includes land the City purchased in the 1970s through Urban Renewal of East End/Valley Street.   The Council action was [...]